World's Oldest Marijuana Stash found in Gobi Desert.


Nearly two pounds of still-green plant material found in a 2,700-year-old grave in the Gobi Desert has just been identified as the world's oldest marijuana stash, according to a paper in the latest issue of the Journal of Experimental Botany. 

A barrage of tests proves the marijuana possessed potent psychoactive properties and casts doubt on the theory that the ancients only grew the plant for hemp in order to make clothing, rope and other objects.
They apparently were getting high too.

Lead author Ethan Russo told Discovery News that the marijuana "is quite similar" to what's grown today.

"We know from both the chemical analysis and genetics that it could produce THC (tetrahydrocannabinolic acid synthase, the main psychoactive chemical in the plant)," he explained, adding that no one could feel its effects today, due to decomposition over the millennia.

Russo served as a visiting professor at the Chinese Academy of Sciences Institute of Botany while conducting the study. He and his international team analyzed the cannabis, which was excavated at the Yanghai Tombs near Turpan, China. It was found lightly pounded in a wooden bowl in a leather basket near the head of a blue-eyed Caucasian man who died when he was about 45.

"This individual was buried with an unusual number of high value, rare items," Russo said, mentioning that the objects included a make-up bag, bridles, pots, archery equipment and a kongou harp. The researchers believe the individual was a shaman from the Gushi people, who spoke a now-extinct language called Tocharian that was similar to Celtic.

Scientists originally thought the plant material in the grave was coriander, but microscopic botanical analysis of the bowl contents, along with genetic testing, revealed that it was cannabis.

Read More: NBC Science News




STUDY Medicinal Marijuana and Diabetes

Preclinical study data published online in the scientific journal Nutrition & Diabetes reports that tetrahydrocannabivarin (THCV) — a naturally occurring analogue of THC — possesses positive metabolic effects in animal models of obesity.

British researchers assessed the effects of THCV administration on dietary-induced and genetically modified obese mice. Authors reported that although THCV administration did not significantly affect food intake or body weight gain in any of the models, it did produce several metabolically beneficial effects, including reduced glucose intolerance, improved glucose tolerance, improved liver triglyceride levels, and increased insulin sensitivity.


Researchers concluded: “Based on these data, it can be suggested that THCV may be useful for the treatment of the metabolic syndrome and/or type 2 diabetes (adult onset diabetes), either alone or in combination with existing treatments. Given the reported benefits of another non-THC cannabinoid, CBD in type 1 diabetes, a CBD/THCV combination may be beneficial for different types of diabetes mellitus.”


Last month, Harvard Medical School researchers published observational data in The American Journal of Medicine reporting that subjects who regularly consume cannabis possess favorable indices related to diabetic control as compared to occasional consumers or non-users of the substance. Writing in an accompanying commentary, the journal’s Editor-in-Chief stated: “These are indeed remarkable observations that are supported, as the authors note, by basic science experiments that came to similar conclusions. … I would like to call on the NIH and the DEA to collaborate in developing policies to implement solid scientific investigations that would lead to information assisting physicians in the proper use and prescription of THC in its synthetic or herbal form.”


Read More: NORML

STUDY More Pot, Less Suicide?


The benefits of legalization – whether for medicinal and/or recreational purposes – are more far-reaching than most people understand. As we continue to put an end to prohibition, we’ll continue to uncover new advantages of doing so. 

Two of the largest, most substantial benefits of legalization that recent studies have indicated; a drastic decrease in both suicides, and traffic fatalities. Who would of known?

A study conducted recently by the Institute for the Study of Labor, with help from researchers such as Daniel I. Rees of the University of Colorado’s Department of Economics, used a comprehensive statistical analysis to discover that states in the U.S. which have legalized medical marijuana saw a significant decrease in overall suicides – 5% in total. The drop was even higher among young adults aged 20 to 29, with an 11% decrease in overall suicides (the increase adds validity to the statistics, as individuals in that age group use cannabis at a considerably higher rate than the average person).

Although this is just one study, it’s extremely promising – it indicates that allowing the use of medical cannabis may have led to hundreds, if not thousands of prevented suicides. This is likely due in part to the fact that, according to university recent research released this month, cannabis can help fight depression and loneliness, and may raise self-esteem.

Does Marijuana Legalization reduce Auto Fatalities? Read More: The Weed Blog


Elevate Accessories 10% OFF w/Code MRSTINKYS

Elevate Accessories 10% OFF w/Code MRSTINKYS
Heirloom Quality Smoking Accessories that are made to Last a Lifetime

Everything at Randy's 10% OFF with MRSTINKYS

Everything at Randy's 10% OFF with MRSTINKYS
Wired Rolling Papers, Hemp Wicks, Cleaners, Vaporizers and More

Popular Posts Last 30 Days

Roll-uh-Bowl