STUDY Could CBDs Cannabidiol help you quit smoking cigarettes?


A team of researchers from University College London published a study in the September issue of the journal Addictive Behaviors that investigated whether low doses of cannabidiol (CBD) would help treat nicotine addiction in tobacco smokers who want to quit.

The research team, led by Celia J.A. Morgan, used a double-blind, placebo controlled model for their study, which consisted of 24 participants (12 male, 12 female) between the ages 18-35. In order to take place in the study, participants were required to smoke, on average, more that 10 cigarettes per day. That being said, they must also have expressed a desire to break the habit.

Participants were asked to record the amount of cigarettes they consumed during the week prior to treatment. After baseline testing, they were split into two groups. Each group was provided with an inhaler – One group received CBD and the other received a placebo. They were then instructed to use the inhaler whenever they felt the urge to smoke.

During the course of the treatment week, participants were asked to record their inhaler use and the number of cigarettes smoked in a journal. Additionally, participants were asked, via text message, to rate their current level of craving once per day.
 
According to the study’s results, the group receiving cannabidiol (CBD) treatment experienced a significant reduction in the number of cigarettes smoked. The same cannot be said of the placebo group, as there was little-to-no change from pre- to post-treatment. Interestingly, the decreased cigarette consumption occurred despite the fact that there was no change in the level of craving reported each day.

According to the research team, craving is often used to indicate the potential for relapse. Cannabidiol (CBD) was found to reduce cigarette consumption without causing craving levels to rise, which the researchers referred to as “a potentially encouraging finding.”

Read More: Medical Jane


MMJ STUDY: Medicinal Marijuana May Treat Aggressive Forms Of Breast Cancer


Contrary to popular belief, breast cancer is not one disease – it is an umbrella term used for many different diseases, according to HER2 Support Group. HER2-positive breast cancer is a particularly aggressive type that forms when there is an over-expression of the HER2 gene. 

Not only does HER2-positive breast cancer grow rapidly, but it is often associated with a poor prognosis and high recurrence rates. Although successful treatments have been designed to target the HER2 gene in particular, research reports that they do not garner a response from everyone.

As we know, cannabis has shown promise in treating a wide variety of cancers, and a Japanese study found cannabinoids to inhibit tumor growth. Accordingly, breast cancer research has turned to medical marijuana for answers.

Spanish Researchers Treated Breast Cancer With Cannabinoids

In 2010, a team of Spanish researchers published a study in the journal Molecular Cancer with the intent to “determine whether cannabinoids might constitute a new therapeutic tool” in the treatment of HER2-positive breast cancer. They analyzed the anti-tumor potential of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and a synthetic cannabinoid with similar effects to cannabidiol (CBD).

In order to analyze each cannabinoid’s potential, the researchers investigated their effects on mice with a similar form of cancer – the Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus. In addition to mouse trials, the researchers examined the effects of cannabis on 87 human breast tumors.

According to the study’s results, THC and CBD had a number of anti-cancer benefits in mice. Both cannabinoids investigated were found to inhibit cancer growth, reduce the number of tumors, and reduce the number and/or severity of metastases (secondary tumors in the lungs).

In studying the human cancer tissue, the researchers found that cannabinoids may inhibit cell proliferation and induce programmed cell death, or aptosis. According to the study, cannabinoids also seem to “impair tumor angiogenesis,” which allows tumors to receive more nutrients by causing blood vessels to grow.

One of the most pertinent findings, according to the study, is that 91% of HER2-positive tumors actively express CB2 receptors. As we know, both THC and CBD interact with CB2 receptors, and this could explain their interaction with breast cancer.

Read More: Medical Jane

MMJ STUDY: Cannabinoids May Aid In Migraines


Researchers Investigated Migraines & Cannabinoids In Rats

 

A team of researchers from the University of California, San Francisco recently published a study in The Journal of Neuroscience centered around the endocannabinoid system and its role in the treatment of migraine headaches. According to their findings, the activation of cannabinoid receptors in the brain may help modulate pain signals.

The research team was comprised of five Department of Neuorology members called the ‘Headache Group’. Knowing that cannabinoids have been tied to the perception of neuropathic pain, the researchers wanted to see if they would have similar success treating the throbbing nature of migraine headaches.

Endocannabinoids May Help Relieve Migraine Headaches

 

The Headache Group investigated the periaqueductal gray matter, the part of the brain that modulates the descending nature of pain, in rats. In particular, they measured the activity of pain receptors and nerve fibers associated with headaches.

‘A delta fibers’ are nerves that respond to cold and pressure. According to the abstract of the Headache Group’s study, activation of the CB1 receptor reduced the amount of A delta fibers by as much as 19%, but there was no change in sensory information from skin on the face. This suggests that the pressure relief was the result of nervous system interactions.

Another bit of proof for CB1-induced migraine relief was discovered when the Headache Group realized that the inhibition of the cannabinoid receptor prevented a decrease in pressure A delta fibers. As the researchers learned, the mechanism that underlies migraine headaches is quite complicated.

Triptans are a family of medicines used to temporarily relieve migraines that are thought to affect serotonin receptors. However, the Headache Group found that the underlying mechanism of migraine relief may involve an interaction between cannabinoid and serotonin receptors in certain areas of the brain. Due to this, the Headache Group believes the endocannabinoid system may be involved in triptan-related relief as well.

Thank You: Medical Jane



Is MMJ Medicinal Marijuana the Next Diabetes Drug?


According to research published in the American Journal of Medicine, while pot smoking has become synonymous with a great appreciation of food, commonly referred to as “the munchies,” there is now new evidence that suggests people on a regular cannabis regimen are far less likely to suffer obesity, and more likely to preserve a lower body-mass-index.

The reason behind this phenomenon, surprisingly, has to do with the impressive metabolic rate of potheads versus their smoke-free counterparts.

"The most important finding is that current users of marijuana appeared to have better carbohydrate metabolism than nonusers," says study author associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School Murray Mittleman. "Their fasting insulin levels were lower, and they appeared to be less resistant to the insulin produced by their body to maintain a normal blood-sugar level."

Out of the 4,600 participants in this study, consisting of both men and women, nearly 50% claimed to have smoked marijuana at least once throughout the course of their lives, while 12% admitted to being enthusiastic pot connoisseurs.

After considering other factors like age, sex, alcohol use, income, tobacco use and frequency of physical activity, researchers concluded that the insulin levels of regular marijuana users were still 16% lower than participants who did not sue pot. Interestingly, the people who claimed to smoke marijuana on a regular basis also showed a 17% decrease in insulin reduction -- indicating they are less likely to acquire Type II diabetes.

Marijuana may also prove beneficial for the heart: the study indicates that marijuana smokers had increased levels of good cholesterol, which is an important factor in protecting against heart disease.

Read More: High Times


MMJ TSA and the DEA Flying the Medicated Skies


According to Lawyers.com, the “mile high club” may take on a completely new meaning as more and more states vote to decriminalize the medicinal and recreational use of cannabis.

 

Everyone has heard the stories of people walking their baby cannabis plants on board airplanes & vaporizing in the terminal, but just how are they getting away with it?

The fact of the matter is that cannabis is federally illegal, and for that reason, it’s technically illegal to fly on commercial airlines with cannabis because airports fall under federal jurisdiction.

Well, you might be shocked to hear that medical marijuana patients have been boarding planes with carry-on luggage in one arm and a two-week old plant in the other since 2010.

The reason is that although TSA may reserve the right to allow any items on the plane, they are not an anti-drug agency, and therefore do not search for cannabis or other drugs during screening. In the case that cannabis is observed during security screening, TSA will defer the complication to a law enforcement officer.

According to a “Special Instructions” section on the TSA’s website:
“TSA security officers do not search for marijuana or other drugs. In the event a substance that appears to be marijuana is observed during security screening, TSA will refer the matter to a law enforcement officer.

Whether or not marijuana is considered “medical marijuana” under local law is not relevant to TSA screening because TSA is governed by federal law and federal law provides no basis to treat medical marijuana any differently than non-medical marijuana.

Even if an item is generally permitted, it may be subject to additional screening or not allowed through the checkpoint if it triggers an alarm during the screening process, appears to have been tampered with, or poses other security concerns. The final decision rests with TSA on whether to allow any items on the plane.”

So…Can I Bring My Medical Marijuana On The Plane?

At the end of the day, this is going to be a grey area that will likely linger until change comes on a federal level. It’s important to note that not all states recognize medical marijuana use authorizations from other states, so if you are leaving California and heading to Boston, you could be violating Massachusetts state law when you land.

According to the founder of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML), Keith Stroup, not even patients flying from Colorado to Washington are 100% protected.

Read More: Medical Jane

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